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Entering the Emergency Room

21 Mar

In the wake a devastating tsunami, the nuclear reactor disaster and all the events that have succeeded the earthquake in Japan, it seems somehow appropriate that I begin my integration period tomorrow in the Emergency Room of a bustling metropolitan hospital. When I told the director of my program that I was very interested in Emergency Preparedness as a subspeciality, I had no idea that she would take my interest so seriously and give me an eight-week ER clinical placement. I feel so lucky, and also SO nervous. I am going to try to document this experience, as I work eight weeks under the tutelage and supervision of a RN. I will be taking her normal hours which means 12-hours shifts for a total of 36 hours per week, for 8 weeks.

In my anxiety-flavored preoccupation over what tomorrow will hold, I called my grandfather, for some sage words of advice. In typical fashion, he proffered a few more that I initially asked for, but absolutely helped to assuage my fears. When I told him I was afraid, he reminded me that it was normal to feel scared in a setting where everyone is having personal crises. Nerves run high, but he told me that among emergency personnel, calmness and composure are paramount. He reminded me that people work together in the ED like a well-oiled machine, and that I will never feel stranded. I hope this last part is true. He also told me something that I know: I will feel uncomfortable. I will not feel proficient. I will make mistakes. But then, I will ask questions and I will learn from these mistakes. If I don’t ask a question when I have one, that is the biggest mistake I can make. This is my time for learning, and I will learn.

He also told me that he knows I will be calm in the face of a crisis. I don’t know how he can be sure of this, since I am certainly not sure of myself, but then he told me about the night when my grandma took his own hypertension medication accidentally, and how terrified he felt. In response, he called his cardiologist at home (ah, the benefits of having doctor colleagues) who told him that he could manage the situation on his own, rather than bring her into the ED so late at night. So, my grandpa pushed his fear back and kept it at bay throughout the night while he stayed awake and cared for the love of his life. He told me that he fed her so much coffee, that by the morning he had induced hypertension in my grandma. Not exactly the most settling story for a granddaughter to hear, but very sweet all the same especially since the outcome was good.

My goal for these few weeks is to chronicle my experience, writing down the wisdom of veteran nurses for my future practice as well as the more fun and interesting cases that I run into. Now I just have to wait a few more hours to see what tomorrow has in store…

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2 Comments

Posted by on March 21, 2011 in Hospital, Memoir, Nursing School

 

Tags: , , , , , ,

2 responses to “Entering the Emergency Room

  1. Betsy Deutsch

    March 21, 2011 at 10:49 pm

    I am so glad Saba had some words of wisdom, and I am so prod of you and can’t wait to talk and read each blog entry avidly. I think this will be a very exciting time, and you are going to be great. I love you so!!!!

     
  2. geena epstein

    March 22, 2011 at 10:42 am

    Rachel..I am SOO excited for you. My best advice…ASK QUESTIONS – and volunteer to do anything you can. If you aren’t sure about something..ask..if you want to try something…ask. Get in there and get your hands dirty…(well, wear your gloves..and get your gloves dirty). you know what I mean. I look forward to hearing all about it. Love Geena (OMG! your future mother-in-law!!) (LOVE IT)

     

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